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Whole Wheat Waffle Recipe

This failproof Whole Wheat Waffle Recipe makes a batch of soft and fluffy waffles with gorgeously crisped golden surfaces, just waiting to be drenched in maple syrup. Made with whole wheat flour and flaxseed, they’re a great way to incorporate a healthy dose of whole grains into a balanced breakfast.

Overhead shot of a whole wheat waffle on a blue plate. The waffle is garnished with berries, butter, and maple syrup.

I don’t know about you, but Belgian waffles are my weakness. Unfortunately, the batter is typically made with regular white flour, making the waffles high glycemic.

Fortunately, I’ve figured out a way to tweak the batter with wholesome, whole-grain ingredients – resulting in a less processed and more nutritious waffle.

Instead of making homemade waffles with white flour, I used whole wheat flour. It’s milled from whole wheatberries, and the entire grain is kept intact, making it a more nutrient-dense flour choice.

In addition to whole wheat flour, these waffles include flaxseed meal for an extra boost of fibrous whole grains.

These whole-grain waffles are an excellent place to start if you’re trying to add more fiber to your breakfasts!

Why You’ll Love This Recipe

  • What’s not to love about fluffy healthy waffles made entirely from scratch?
  • This homemade waffle recipe is made with a short list of nutritious ingredients, most of which you may already have in your kitchen.
  • In many cases, whole-grain versions of traditional foods are just as yummy. These delicious waffles are a great example! 
  • Its rich color, robust taste, and hearty texture make it the perfect contender for healthy waffles.
  • Like their freezer-aisle counterpart, these homemade waffles freeze like a dream and can be popped into the toaster directly from the freezer.

An overhead shot of whole wheat waffles laying on a marble background.

Ingredients You’ll Need

  • Whole wheat flour – This whole grain flour has a baking profile similar to regular white flour but is less processed and more nutrient-dense.
  • Flaxseed meal – Enriches the waffles with additional fiber and plant-sourced protein.
  • Baking powder – This leavening agent helps the batter rise as it bakes.
  • Salt – A little bit of salt helps to enhance the flavor.
  • Sugar – Adds an excellent sweet base. A granulated refined sugar-free natural sweetener should work as well, like coconut sugar, maple sugar, or date sugar.
  • Eggs – Eggs help strengthen the ingredients into a cohesive batter.
  • Milk – Dissolves the flour to create a smooth and stable waffle batter. You can make these whole wheat waffles with any milk. However, I find that regular dairy milk results in crispier waffles. On the other hand, waffles made with non-dairy milk tend to be a bit soggy.
  • Unsweetened applesauce – Apple sauce brings natural sweetness to the waffles while keeping them light and fluffy. As an alternative to applesauce, try pumpkin puree or mashed banana.
  • Olive oil – Oil adds moisture and makes the waffles more tender. Make sure to use mild, light-tasting olive oil. Avocado oil also works.
  • Vanilla extract – Vanilla enhances the flavor of the waffles with a soft and sweet cream-like element.

How To Make Whole Wheat Waffles

Step 1: Whisk the dry ingredients.

Add flour, flaxseed meal, baking powder, salt, and sugar to a large mixing bowl and whisk lightly until combined.

Two side by side pictures of the dry ingredients in a glass bowl. In the picture on the right, the ingredients are mixed with a whisk.

Step 2: Mix the wet ingredients.

In a separate bowl, beat the eggs with a fork until smooth. Then add the milk, applesauce, olive oil, and vanilla extract. Mix well.

Two side by side pictures of the wet ingredients in a glass bowl. In the picture on the right, the ingredients are mixed with a whisk.

Step 3: Mix the waffle batter.

Pour the wet batter into the bowl of dry ingredients and stir until just combined. Let the batter stand for 5 minutes before using.

Two side by side pictures of the dry and wet ingredients being mixed together.

Step 4: Cook the waffles.

Add the waffle batter to your waffle iron, and cook until the waffles are firm, golden, tender, and fluffy on the inside. This typically takes about 3 to 5 minutes. Enjoy immediately, or transfer the waffles to a wire rack to cool before storing them.

Two side by side pictures with waffles. In the picture on the left, the waffles are on the griddle of an waffle maker. In the picture on the right, the waffles are on a cooling rack.

Recipe Tips

  • Time-saving tip – Preheat your waffle iron while you make the batter, so it’s ready to cook when you are.
  • Do not overmix – Do your best not to overmix the batter. It can result in dense, chewy waffles.
  • Grease the iron – Be sure to grease your waffle iron well and keep it greased as you work through the batter.
  • Do not overfill – I like using a measuring cup to portion the perfect amount of batter for each waffle. The amount you will need will vary depending on the size of your waffle maker. What is most important is that you do not overfill the molds.
  • Keep warm – To keep the waffles warm while you work through the batter, set your oven as low as it will go, and keep the cooked waffles in the oven on a baking sheet until you’re ready to serve.
  • Let cool – If you aren’t planning to eat these right away, let the waffles cool completely before refrigerating or freezing, or else the condensation may make them soggy.

A side view shot of a whole wheat waffle on a blue plate. The waffle is garnished with berries, butter, and maple syrup.

Variations

Adding mix-ins is never a bad idea.

Here are a few ideas:

  • Chocolate Waffles – Add 1/3 cup of chocolate chips and/or 2 to 3 tablespoons of cocoa powder to the batter.
  • Peanut Butter Banana Waffles – Stir in a couple of tablespoons of peanut butter and garnish with sliced bananas and a drizzle of more peanut butter before serving.
  • Blueberry Waffles – Fold 1/3 cup of fresh or frozen blueberries directly into the batter before cooking.

Toppings

As for toppings, I love my waffles drizzled with pure maple syrup or honey and LOTS of fresh berries or fresh fruit, but that’s just me!

Check out the list below for ways to personalize your batch of whole-wheat waffles:

  • Fruit topping – You can’t go wrong with fruit. Serve your waffles with fresh sliced strawberries, diced apples, and baked fruit.
  • Fruit spread and syrups – Top with fruit-flavored jam, jelly, compote, or sauce. I like this raspberry sauce or this blueberry sauce.
  • Nuts – Sprinkle chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans on top for some crunch.
  • Serve à la mode – Make these whole grain waffles extra special with a scoop of Greek yogurt, whipped cream, whipped coconut cream, or a dollop of sweetened mascarpone.

Storing & Freezing

Storing: If you’re lucky enough to have leftovers, let them cool, then store them in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 3 days. To reheat leftovers, toast the waffles in a toaster, toaster oven, or air fryer until the golden crisp is restored and the waffles are warmed through.

Freezing: I encourage you to make a double or even triple batch of waffles so that you can stock your freezer with healthy whole wheat waffles. On busy mornings, you can grab, toast, and go.

To freeze, let the waffles cool completely on a wire rack. Then place them on a baking sheet and set it in the freezer. Once the waffles are flash-frozen, transfer them to a freezer-safe resealable bag and keep the bag in the freezer for up to 3 months.

Reheating: To reheat frozen homemade waffles, toast them individually in a toaster or a single layer in a toaster oven or air fryer. I don’t recommend reheating frozen waffles in the microwave.

Whole wheat waffle on a blue plate, The waffles is garnished with berries, butter, and maple syrup. A silver fork is to the right of the waffle.

Frequently Asked Questions

What’s the difference between baking powder and baking soda?

They may look and sound the same, but baking powder and baking soda are entirely different ingredients that are not interchangeable.

Baking soda is 100 percent sodium bicarbonate, while baking powder is sodium bicarbonate with an added acid. Since baking powder includes acid, it’s used in recipes (like this one) where the ingredients are mainly low acidic.

Can I make egg-free whole wheat waffles?

This recipe was tested with eggs, but you should be able to use flax “egg” instead without issue.

To make one flax egg, combine one tablespoon of flaxseed meal with two tablespoons of water, and let stand until the mixture thickens into a gelatinous, eggy consistency.

Can I use whole spelt flour instead of whole wheat flour for these waffles?

Yup! Whole spelt flour and whole wheat flour can be swapped 1:1 in most recipes.

More Healthy Recipes You’ll Love

Whole Wheat Waffle Recipe

Whole Wheat Waffle Recipe

Yield: 16 waffles
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Additional Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes

These fluffy whole wheat waffles are made from scratch with simple, budget-friendly ingredients. Serve them with your favorite toppings for a quick and easy breakfast. Make a big batch to freeze them for later.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1/3 cup flaxseed meal
  • 1 Tbsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 Tbsp sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 3/4 cup milk
  • 1/3 unsweetened apple sauce
  • 1 Tbsp mild olive oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. In a mixing bowl, combine whole wheat flour, flaxseed meal, baking powder, salt, and sugar. Whisk to combine.
  2. To another bowl, add the eggs and beat them with a fork. Then add the milk, apple sauce, olive oil, and vanilla extract. Mix well.
  3. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir just until combined. Let the batter stand for 5 minutes before baking.
  4. Bake the waffles following the instructions of your waffle maker.
  5. Let the waffles cool completely on a cookie rack. Then store or freeze.

Nutrition Information
Yield 16 Serving Size 1 waffle
Amount Per Serving Calories 99Total Fat 3gSaturated Fat 1gTrans Fat 0gUnsaturated Fat 2gCholesterol 25mgSodium 259mgCarbohydrates 14gFiber 2gSugar 3gProtein 4g

Nutrition facts provided on this website are an estimate and not guaranteed to be accurate. Please see a qualified health care provider for personalized diet advice and make sure that each of the ingredients is allowed in your diet.

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